Category Archives: Civil Rights Activists

The Impact Of The Civil Rights Act Of 1964

The landmark piece of legislation in the fight for civil rights was the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Enacted in 1964, this act outlawed discrimination based on color, race, or national origin. It prohibited racial segregation in public schools, protected voter’s registration rights and prohibited separation based on discrimination in all public places.
When the Act was first passed, the government did not provide very strong enforcement authority. This was supplemented and strengthened over the next several years. Congress used its authority under various parts of the Constitution as the foundation for the legislation.

These authorities were principally its duty under the Fourteenth Amendment to protect all citizens equally under the laws, its power under Article One to regulate interstate commerce and the duty under the Fifteenth Amendment to protect voting rights. The Act was signed by President Lyndon B. Johnson in July of 1964.

The Civil Rights Act was the result of many years of activist lobbying for comprehensive protection of civil rights. The legislation was first sent to Congress in 1963 by President John F. Kennedy, but as a result of stalling tactics by certain Southern segregationist, Senators was delayed in the Judiciary Committee. Following the assassination of President Kennedy, President Johnson made it his priority to get this legislation passed.

The legislation included provisions that barred segregation and discrimination in public facilities, education, housing, and jobs. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission was also created by the legislation. This commission’s goal was to ensure fair hiring practices. It also established the Comunity Relations Service, a federal organization focused on helping local communities as they dealt with civil rights issues. The U.S. Office of Education was also authorized to provide financial aid to communities as they moved to desegregate public schools.

There was significant resistance to the implementation of the Act. There were strong emotions on both sides and George Wallace, the Governor of Alabama ran for President of the United States on an anti-integration campaign and actually did well in the presidential primaries of 1964 in Wisconsin, Indiana, and Maryland.

Initially, there was some confusion as to whether or not the legislation applied to the private sector. In the beginning, some public venues tried to turn into private clubs instead of being forced to integrate. Eventually, the Supreme Court declared these types of actions a violation of the law. This determination upheld the constitutionality of the Civil Rights Act and its equal access provisions.

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Famous Black Women Activists You Should Know About

The civil rights movement is active in the United States and there are many women who are active in the movement. There are plenty of good people working hard to better the lives of black people and help them achieve economic independence and equality.

Though slavery has been over for more than 100 years, many blacks are still feeling the effects of slavery all these years later. Racism is alive and well, and even on the rise, and blacks have been kept down in many ways. They have been profiled by the police and denied opportunities right and left. Activists are busy trying to right the wrongs in society and many have lost their lives in the process.

Women have been active in the movement since the beginning. Angela Davis was heavily involved with the Black Panthers and is now a professor. Rosa Parks refused to move to the back of the bus. Modern activists like Kamala Harris are working within the political system to try to change things.

The modern civil rights movement is working to end segregation in the south and is pushing for a more equal public school system. The movement is trying to end violence in the community and make sure that children and adults have enough food and medical care. Poverty is a huge problem in many black communities and activists are trying to level the economic playing field through many types of programs.

The school system is a big mess as well, with poor students going to schools that do not have enough funding. Poor black kids are just not getting the education they need to keep up with the job market. Modern activists are starting programs that are helping to teach kids what they are going to need to know to go to college and get a job.

Black males have a higher incarceration rate than any other race. Civil rights activists are working to help release prisoners who have been wrongly convicted and help rehabilitate them when they get out so they can get jobs and not have to resort to crime.

The black community has many problems to overcome, but it is getting help from the male and female activists who want to help change things for the better. Civil rights are more important now than ever, especially in today’s hate-filled political climate.

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The History of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire

One of the worst fire catastrophes occurred at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory. By the end of the incident, the fire had claimed the lives of 146 people. Many died from the flames or severe smoke inhalation but more died due to the shoddy conditions of the fire escapes or by jumping to the pavement some eight stories below to avoid the heat.

Most of the women who died that day were factory workers from the Italian Jewish Immigrant community. The oldest known victim was 43 and the youngest victims were 14.

The factory had been set up on the top three floors of a ten-story commercial building which would soon become a monument in the Greenish Village area in Manhattan. It was late in the afternoon on March 25th 1911, and many people were leaving work when the fire started on the eighth floor of the building. The Fire Marshall determined a burning cigarette or match to be the culprit in the fire.

The fire department was called immediately and the people in the building were beginning to evacuate when the flames quickly engulfed the building. When the elevators stopped working the panicking employees rushed to the only fire escape which was in poor conditions. It collapsed and carried 20 women to their deaths below.

 

The building owners had changed many of the escape routes shut, as was common practice to avoid theft and crime. Many people were trapped inside or jumped from the high windows to avoid a painful death in the flames.

Witnesses were horrified to see the many women jumping from the windows. When the fire brigade did arrive at the scene, their ladders were only tall enough to reach the seventh floor and they weren’t able to rescue many people. The Asch Building still stands today and is a tourist attraction in Manhattan.

The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire was one of the worst catastrophes to hit the industrial age and was not quickly forgotten. Because of it, the fire department began to establish many new regulations regarding fire safety. The practice of chaining fire escapes shut was expressly forbidden.

The horrific death of so many young women was also crucial in establishing factory safety standards that would be enforced by the fire department. The International Ladies Garment Workers Union was also established which would fight for the rights and improved working conditions of workers.

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Who Was Harvey Milk? A Quick Primer

Where Was Milk’s Life Like?
Harvey Milk did not grow up in San Francisco, the city that made him famous. In fact, he is a native of Woodmere, New York. He was not a vocal advocate of liberal politics or gay rights in his early life. Quite the contrary, Milk lived a conservative, closeted life and spent time in the Navy until the campaign season of 1964. He befriended a theater director and eventually began to live a more open life. What once were secretive, quiet trysts became open relationships as his confidence and identity grew. As his experiences varied, Milk found his politics changing and he was vocal about them.
Milk bounced between the east and west coasts between 1969 and 1972. He eventually settled down to begin his camera business on Castro Street in 1972, and decided to run for Supervisor in 1973. Milk’s first bid was unsuccessful, but he proved scrappy in a fairly hostile political environment.
What Were Milk’s Views Like?
Harvey Milk ended up making alliances with the Teamsters and drove a community boycott of Coors products. The political alliance proved helpful, as this launched a gay-friendly hiring initiative among the Teamsters. Milk also befriended many small business owners he worked alongside daily on Castro street and elsewhere in the district. He showed the power of being backed by a law firm that fights for your rights, sought out progressive tax reform, affordable housing for low-income residents, and public resources for working mothers. Milk also aimed directly at anti-gay discrimination by writing a bill to ban discrimination in housing, employment, and public resource accommodations. This ordinance passed almost unanimous support in March of 1978 and was written into law.
What Happened To Harvey Milk?
Harvey Milk’s landmark anti-discrimination ordinance had exactly one opponent upon vote — co-Supervisor Dan White. White resigned in 1978, citing salary concerns. However, he was prodded by fellow conservatives to recover his resigned post to try and slow the growth of progressivism in the district. Upon unsuccessfully trying to convince Mayor Moscone to return his post to him, White snuck into the basement of City Hall with a revolver. He murdered Moscone after one last attempt to recover his public office post by force, and proceeded to murder Milk after.
What Was Harvey Milk Famous For?
Harvey Milk was one of the first openly gay men to hold public office in the United States. Milk’s career was exceptionally notable as he was elected to office at a time when the American psychiatric profession and the general public still considered homosexuality to be a mental illness. Milk’s life and career ended when he was murdered by a former co-officer on November 27th, 1978, after being blamed for increasingly progressive views in the San Francisco area they serviced. His remarkable achievements are still remembered by the gay community and public servants alike to this day.

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Black Athletes And The Emergence of Black Activism

It was Muhammad Ali that set the trend for black athletes to get their opinion out about active racism in America.

He was able to spread the word and make people listen to him even if it meant he had to face professional repercussions. His efforts are spoken of to this day and are a big part of American history when it comes to battling racism and black activism among athletes.

In recent times, the topic has taken a new step forward, and numerous athletes are starting to take a look at joining in and making their voices heard.

Lebron James

One of the more prominent names that have been making the rounds is Lebron James. He is well-regarded as the best North American athlete on offer right now and is a megastar around the world. His voice is heard, and he took to Twitter as a medium to get his word out.

He was backing Stephen Curry from the Golden State Warriors who decided he would not attend the White House celebrations that take place for NBA champions. He felt Trump was not representing the White House as one should when it comes to racism and related topics.

Lebron James stepped behind Stephen Curry’s decision and stated he deserved full backing.

Social Media

Black athletes are not as afraid to get their word out because of their robust social media followings. These are professional athletes who have millions upon millions of followers under their belt, and the word spreads like wildfire when they put it out.

For example, Lebron James has a Twitter account with over 38.5 million followers at the moment of writing this.

It’s a staggering number and one that is growing day by day due to his black activism. Black athletes are willing to put themselves out there to ensure racism is not allowed to flourish in America.

Role Models

One of the biggest reasons black athletes are encouraged to use their voice has to do with their presence as role models and planning lawyers.

These are professionals who are looked up to, and their voices are appreciated. This is why the likes of Lebron James, Stephen Curry, and Colin Kaepernick are more than willing to raise their hands as the next wave of black activists in sports.

The number is quickly rising as more and more athletes jump in and start to look at establishing themselves.

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The Civil Rights Movement

Our country doesn’t have the greatest history when it comes to racism. But since the time of slavery, we have made leaps and bounds. Most of this change came from The Civil Rights Movement which ended The Jim Crow Laws (separate but equal) and allowed African Americans to have the same rights as white citizens. Unfortunately, our country still has racism which is causing more and more political movements as we speak (for example Black Lives Matter).

The Civil Rights Movement was not the first political activist movement but it was one that happened in recent history that still plays a role in our daily lives. When you think of The Civil Rights Movement you think of key activists such as Martin Luther King Jr, Malcolm X, Rosa Parks and more. Here are the Top 10 Civil Rights Movement activists who made a tremendous difference in the rights of African Americans in The United States.

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